cohousing

Homeschooling in Cohousing

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Are you seeking a home that gives you and your child the open space and resources homeschooling families cherish?

Our Common House features a library, children’s play room, large kitchen, dining room, television room, study room and even two guest rooms for your visiting friends and family.The highlights of our adjacent neighborhood include a massive Eucalyptus grove, a bike path that leads to the beach and a pesticide-free farm. We’re a 5-minute drive to the beach and the gorgeous Oceano dunes, we’re just 20 minutes from California Polytechnic University and San Luis Obispo, and we’re half-way between Los Angeles and San Francisco.Speaking of cities… thinking of getting away from one? The Central Coast offers a break from soaring real estate prices, impossible traffic and questionable air quality. Come to our oasis and see for yourself. Your children will love the sense of freedom and connection with nature here!While life in cohousing carries many responsibilities and, like homeschooling, is a lifestyle choice, the benefits of living here are tremendous. Generations of homeschoolers have enjoyed the space here with their families, and we invite you to come tour our home to see if it’s the right fit for you!Feel free to contact us anytime (contact@tncoho.com) for more information about how Tierra Nueva cohousing and homeschooling are a great match.

Play time at Tierra Nueva cohousing
Play time at Tierra Nueva cohousing

Homeschooling in Tierra Nueva Cohousing
Homeschooling in Tierra Nueva Cohousing
Tierra Nueva cohousing is a special community where people of different ages own or rent their own private homes – but they share common resources, including a workshop, garden, yoga studio, and an entire Common House.We understand the interests of homeschoolers since we’ve had many children schooled – and unschooled – at home here over the years. Our children have the outdoor safety families seek (cars park on the exterior and our informal Neighborhood Watch is always in effect) and they have the privacy and quiet we all need.

There are 27 homes on the community’s 5 acres of land, including common outdoor areas with a trampoline, play structure and grassy fields. The community is built on an avocado orchard. Guacamole anyone?

Here’s more about how Tierra Nueva is such a great fit for homeschoolers:

Annual Rituals

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Tierra Nueva Halloween

We have many traditions and events at Tierra Nueva involving young and elders alike. Here’s an outline:

January: On January 1 each year at 9:00am, residents go to Pismo Beach and run into the water (in bathing suits) to celebrate New Years Day. Then they quickly run out of the water, stand around taking photos and brrrrrr-ing and eventually make their way back to their cars. Then at 11:00am they have a potluck brunch in the Common House.

Easter: An Easter egg hunt is usually arranged in the Serenity Garden.

July: On July 4, we have a potluck BBQ and then gather on the Village Green for fireworks when the sun starts going down. Someone brings the large Tierra Nueva wooden sign behind the carports in the dog run, lays down the sign and we lay out the fireworks for a great display!

October: We have an annual Day of the Dead event. Halloween – The little kids often Trick or Treat around the neighborhood!

November: Thanksgiving- Usually there is a potluck Thanksgiving dinner in the Common House organized by folks who are in town.

December: We have a Hanukkah gathering, and we buy a Christmas Tree to display in the Common House at around the beginning of the month. Decorations are stored in the television room. A holiday celebration party is arranged that has included a potluck and a White Elephant gift exchange.

Welcome to Tierra Nueva Cohousing

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Please find lots of information in the menu above!

This is our blog that shares stories, events and ideas from this beautiful community.

Our annual ritual of diving into the frigid Pacific Ocean on January 1.
Our annual ritual of diving into the frigid Pacific Ocean on January 1.